formats

How to Eat Veggies – Different than you’ve ever heard

Published on October 30, 2014 by in Uncategorized

veggiesVeggies. You know you need to eat them, but you don’t – or at least not enough of them. As a trainer, one of the biggest struggles I find my clients dealing with is nutrition and vegetables (or lack thereof). Here are some easy ways to get more veggies in your diet. WARNING: some of them are a bit unconventional.

 

Method 1: Veggies by Injection

 

This fairly new concept of ingesting (or “injecting”) vegetables allows you to get all of the benefits of vegetables without having to chew, taste, or swallow them. Dr. Jose Doez from the University of Southern District Columbia has been an advocate of vegetable injections for nearly a decade. Doez says, “This is not the 1960’s anymore. There are alternative ways giving your body the vitamins and nutrients it really needs from natural sources.”

 

Vegetable injections can be done easily at home by simply using a food processor to break down the vegetables and then adding water to make the solution “injectable.” A small amount of aluminum is added as well. The solution can then be injected using an 18-gauge needle and syringe.

 

Dr. Doez recommends using clean needles and not sharing needles – even with family members. “The risk of contracting a disease from from sharing veggie needles may outway the benefits of the vegetables themselves,” says Doez.

 

DISCLAIMER AND WARNING: I completely made up Method 1. DO NOT inject vegetables into your bloodstream!

 

And now that I am done being a smartass, here are some REAL ways of getting veggies in: Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Today’s Workout: Upper Body Supersets

I got behind and missed posting the workout yesterday. Oops.

 

And I was thinking of something witty to say to go along with today’s workout, but I got nothing.

 

Without further ado, here is my workout for today (yesterday):

 

Upper Body Supersets


Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

I punched a client when he told me he ate a donut

Published on October 29, 2014 by in Just for fun

Donuts_(Coffee_An),_Westport,_CT_06880_USA_-_Feb_2013The other day I was getting ready to meet with one of my clients when the unexpected happened…

 

He came in with a look of discomfort on his face. The air stunk with shame as he approached me with his head hung low in embarrassment. “You’re going to hate me,” he said, “I know I shouldn’t have, but I ate a couple of donuts this weekend.”

 

“You did what?”

 

“I’m sorry. It was just a couple. I know, I know – I shouldn’t have…”

 

I immediately interrupted him. “How many is a ‘couple?’” I said while using my fingers as quotation marks.

 

“Like… two. And then just a small amount of creamer in my coffee.”

 

That did it.

 

BAM!!! I gave him a right cross straight to the jaw, watched him nearly fall to the ground, and spoke up with authority: “Now listen to me. Your jaw doesn’t feel to good right now does it?” His silence was an undercover answer of ‘yes’ from what I could tell. “I want you to think how this feels next time you even think about eating a donut, let alone two.”

 

“Yes, sir,” he said, still unable to look me in the eye. “I won’t do it again.”

 

“I know you won’t.” I motioned to him to follow me over to an open space on the gym floor. Then I explained, “It’s going to take about 150 burpees to burn off one of those donuts, and you ate two, so that’s 300. Then we’ll add another 100 for the coffee creamer – so, 400. Go ahead and get started; we only have one hour today.”

 

Catch on to my over-the-top sarcasm yet?

 

I really DON’T punch my clients. I don’t even get mad if they eat on donut (fried chicken, pizza, etc.) because I do the same thing – sometimes. That’s the A- way.

 

However, I do run into to people who sometimes feel like, “Oh crap, I better not tell my personal trainer how I ate.” Hopefully it’s not from a fear of getting punched. What I do think it has to do with is guilt.

 

I’m not a fan of that.

 

I don’t think anyone should need to feel guilted or pressured into eating healthy or exercising. Sure, a little healthy accountability is a good thing, but feeling ashamed of a donut or a skipped workout is not cool. It is important, however, that a donut here and there does not turn into a donut every day.

 

Most things are fine in moderation.

 

Let’s not beat ourselves up over imperfection. Strive to do good – eat good, exercise good, and live a healthy lifestyle.


Keep the donuts and other junk at less than 10% and I promise that I will not punch you. In fact, I’ll even eat a donut with you. It’s a date. Donuts and burpees – it will be a blast!

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Today’s Workout: Upper Body with Bands

As a new feature on the blog, I am bringing my workouts to the public. You can follow along with my routine if you want by checking in on the blog, or you can enter your email address and get your the workouts sent directly to your email. So one day when I’m famous you can say, “I’ve been working out with Glen since 2014.”

I thought about what to call these workouts. Do I piggyback off Crossfit and use the WOD (workout of the day)? Do I make up my own fancy acronym?

TWO – Today’s Workout

WOT – Workout of Today

GGFDCFW – GlenGoschFitness.Com’s Featured Workout.

Maybe I’ll just call it something new each time. We’ll see.

Today’s Workout: Upper Body with Bands

Today I had to switch up my routine from what I wanted to do.

I am dealing with a couple of things:

I just got a steroid shot in my knee to help rehabilitate a torn MCL from several months ago. Nothing major, but the doc said to “take it easy” on the knee for a couple of weeks.
I planned on doing some upper body exercises at the gym today, but then I had some family issues and did not have time to get my morning workout in at the gym.

Enter the GGFDCFW for today: Upper body with resistance bands. I wanted to do something for my upper body that would not put any strain on my knee. So no lifting weights over my head – did not want to put pressure on the knee. No pushups – it’s surprising how much your knees/quads are involved when in the plank position. I discovered that when I first sprained my knee last November.

So the bands were the perfect solution for today.

Here is the workout:

  • Chest press with bands anchored in doorway
  • Single arm row with bands anchored in the doorway
  • Shoulder press
  • Triceps press down with bands anchored in the doorway
  • Biceps curls

I did that as a circuit, twice.

  • Chest Fly, bands in doorway
  • Upright row
  • Front/lateral raises
  • Triceps Kickbacks
  • Biceps curls with bands anchored in doorway, arms horizontally extended and curling toward the head.

Done as a circuit as well, twice.

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.04.55 PM

Curl, band attached to door

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.05.54 PM

Kickback

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.03.48 PM

Upright row

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.01.47 PM

Front raise

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.01.02 PM

Lateral raise

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 8.00.12 PM

Chest fly

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 7.58.49 PM

Biceps Curl

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 7.57.12 PM

Shoulder press

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 7.58.05 PM

Triceps press down

Screenshot 2014-10-27 at 7.55.40 PM

Single arm row

 

 

Not making it to the gym is NOT an excuse to not workout. I got a nice little burn using the bands, and I expect to be sore tomorrow being that I have not used the bands in a while.

See you tomorrow!

 

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Beating Failure: How I Brought my Fitness Level to A-

Untitled drawing (2)Confession: My personal training career almost never started. Not because I didn’t have the know-how. Not because I didn’t have the drive to wake up and push people to achieve amazing results. It was not from a lack of passion for health and fitness. The problem was this: I didn’t measure up to my own standards. I took a good hard look in the mirror and this is what I saw: body fat. Not a lot, just a little bit. Just enough to question myself and think, “This is not the body of a TRUE fitness professional.”

I remember sharing my (looking back, irrational) thoughts with my wife Jaki. In a voice that rang with self-doubt and unconfidence, I pinched my six-pack-less abs and said, “Look at this.”

“Look at what?” she said.

“This! This flab! I don’t know about this whole personal training thing.” My sarcastic sense of humor began to erupt in series of self-ridiculing questions and statements. “What am I going to do? Tell people, ‘You can almost achieve your goals with Glen?’ Maybe I should start an ad campaign: ‘Are you ready for 4-pack abs? Then get started with Glen Gosch today!’ Or ‘Get Glen Gosch’s ‘Not Quite Ripped’ fitness plan, and you too can be better than average.’”

After laughing a little at my Not Quite Ripped ad campaign rant, Jaki responded, “You look good Glen. There are a lot of people that would love to look as good as you.”

That was the problem. I didn’t want to look “good,” I wanted to look GREAT! I wanted to look ripped!

Once upon a time… I was ripped.

The thing is, I have been there before. In high school and shortly after, I boasted the six pack. I remember one time I went to the mall with some girlfriends and one of the vendors was doing free body fat tests – I think it was a supplement shop or something. Anyway, I measured in at 5% if I remember right. My girlfriend and her friend took their measurements and subsequently each gave me a visual “#$%! YOU!”

Back then, it was easy. My pre-workout meal was Taco Bell, and my post-workout meal often composed of a Colossal Burger (pastrami, beef patty, cheese, 1000 Island dressing, a leaf of lettuce, a slice of tomato, and a bun) and fries washed down with a Coke from a local burger joint called Yellow Basket in my hometown of Temecula.

Unfortunately, that diet doesn’t work too well past age 20 for most people.

Fast forward to more recent times…

I gained a bunch of weight in my twenties. I tipped the scale at about 213 pounds – and I know weight is relative, but believe me, 213 pounds is way too big for my frame. Eventually I had a breaking point where I said, “Enough!”

Long story, short: I lost about 50 pounds. I felt great and looked good.

But now I wanted more. I wanted to look like I did in high school.

I got close, but unlike the diet I followed back in my hay day of ripped-hood, I had to really dial things in. I tracked my macronutrients intensely. I worked out hard. I prepared every meal from scratch. A “cheat” meal was a Lean Cuisine meal. I got down to around 10 or 11 percent body fat with this. Then I got stuck. I could not break the double digit fat percentage barrier that was blocking me and all of my hard work from the Holy Grail of fitness: The six pack abs.

For a while I maintained that weight and body fat percentage and didn’t go as strict on the diet. I would have some beer here and there and the occasional dessert, but overall stayed pretty clean with my eating.

Then I heard about this diet “cleanse” from Tony Horton (the P90X guy) in his book “Bring It!” I figured if I wanted to look like the guy in P90X, I should eat like the guy in P90X. This is nothing like a faddish lemon juice cleanse or anything either. This involved no calorie fasting and no calorie restrictions. Here is how it went:

Week 1: Eliminate coffee and caffeine-containing products and alcohol. Also eliminate foods with added sugar and other processed foods.
Week 2: Eliminate gluten-containing products.
Week 3: Eliminate dairy products.
Week 4: Eliminate all other animal products.

Only I decided to do it all in one week.

I maintained this for about 5 months. Seriously. I was a bartender, with my old friends Jack Daniels, Jim Beam, and that old Canadian fellow who simply went by “Crown” around me at all times, and I did not touch any of them (well, I touched them – they just went into a patron’s shot glass and not my own). I brought vegan meals to work with me. I was “that guy” – special-ordering vegan meals at restaurants. At Thanksgiving I splurged with about 6 ounces of turkey and I think I might have had some fish and chicken a time or two in that 5-month period, but that was it.

The result: I got down to 145 pounds and about 8 or 9 percent body fat. I could see the lines in my abs. Victory. Er – sort of. I was not yet satisfied. Something was pissing me off. I didn’t look like I did at age 19 with the 5% body fat. The truth is, even though I was incredibly lean; even though it was uncomfortable to sit for long periods of time due to a lack of fat on my butt; even though I had veins showing on my neck; even though… it was not good enough. I wouldn’t even take a picture of my body at 145 pounds because I didn’t think I looked ripped enough. I did not yet look like I was supposed to look. When I looked in the mirror, all I could see was this thin layer of fat around my stomach that stuck out like a turd in a punch bowl (at least in my eyes). I did not look like a fitness model or even like my teenage self, and it frustrated the hell out of me!

At this point I started getting the comments: “You’ve lost too much weight” and “You look too skinny.” Too skinny? I wasn’t done yet! I still had to drop at least another 2% of my body fat to look like I wanted to.

After months (which was really a culmination of a year) of really trying to cut down to that 5 or 6 percent body fat, I had still not reached my ultimate goal.

At the end of one of my graveyard bartending shifts – I worked 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. in a small 24-hour casino – my friend Tanya came in to relieve me and take over for the day shift. She told me, “Today is the first day of Lent. But… with the lifestyle you’re living, I guess you really don’t have anything to give up, huh? You don’t eat meat, don’t drink, don’t eat sweets, don’t even eat bread – what could you give up?”

I had one of those moments, you know, where about a thousand thoughts run through your head in 3.5 seconds. A whole bunch of “why’s.” Why do I need to get so ripped? Why do I need to eat so restricted? Why this, and why that. What am I really accomplishing here? On a scale of 1 to 10, my diet was a 10.7 (an A+), yet I still felt like a failure. I sighed. “Maybe I’ll give up being vegan.”

“That’s not fair!”

“Maybe not. Will you order me some bacon and eggs? And I’ll have a Sierra Nevada.”

“Okay, then.” A smile came my way which was reciprocated back.

Life after Vegan

So, I came to realize the whole six pack quest is sort of a pain in the ass and I went on with a not-so-strict diet. With this I returned to my godforsaken state of the double-digit fat realm.

Oh, see Glen, that’s the problem. You have to try the Paleo diet. Tried it.

No, no, no. Intermittent Fasting, that’s the way to go. Tried that too.

Maybe you’re not eating enough calories. Not an issue.

Maybe you need to eat more fat, more protein, less fat, or less protein.

No, no – double no! Don’t you know anything about leptin?

I’ve been down all of these roads, none of which had brought me complete rippedness. Because, at the time, I still wanted to hit that freaking six pack goal. I was willing to do whatever it took to get there. I wanted my abs up on Mount Ripped-more with Tony Horton, Bob Harper, Shaun T, and Jack LaLanne.

Then, I just said, “Screw it!”

Enter the A- Approach

Back to modern-day. Right now I am at about 12 to 14 percent body fat. I might dip down to 10 or 11 percent if I eat clean for a month or two. Here’s the thing though: I eat pizza, ice cream, bacon, eggs, and cheese. I pretty much eat what I want. BUT, there’s a catch. I also WANT to eat healthy things. I have no intention of finding that 50 pounds of fat that I lost over 4 years ago, and eating healthy was a big part of that weight loss. I truthfully enjoy salad, raw vegetables, a bowl of cold fresh fruit, a healthy smoothie – and those are the things I eat most of the time.

My workouts are similar. I train how I want, when I want to. Sometimes I only work out 3 days per week. Sometimes I really feel like training hard for several weeks or months in a row. Most times, I train 4 or 5 days per week. What am I training for if there is no race, no competition, and no award to be won? My 100th birthday party.

Some of the time I give my workout and diet routine an “A” grade, sometimes I am running a low “B” and exercising the 80/20 rule (80 percent clean, 20 percent not-so-clean – i.e. cookies, ice cream, white pasta, etc).

Over the course of year, that averages out to about 90% – an “A-” on the grading scale.

I can do over 20 pull ups, but you won’t find me breaking any deadlift records. I can run a 10K without puking, but the thought of running 26.2 miles makes me a little queasy. I am not ripped, I am fit. I can keep up with my kids playing at the park, I can do push ups of varying degrees, I can lift heavy things without throwing out my back, I have stamina (in the gym and elsewhere). I don’t get a medal or prize for any of these things, but I feel pretty damn good about myself.
When it comes to diet I eat fairly “clean.” I eat salad, organic fruits and veggies, lean meats, fish, nuts, seeds – mostly whole, nutritious foods. I also eat a hot dog, a slice (okay, several slices) of pizza, donuts, ice cream, bacon, and an occasional glass of wine when I feel like it.
Here’s what I DO NOT do: I do not take an “all or nothing” approach. Other than taking some time off for an injury, I can’t think of any time in the last 4 or 5 years that I have not worked out at least 3 days in a week. I can’t think of any time when my diet on a scale of 1 to 10 was below an 8 – 80%, B-. Okay, maybe between the week of Christmas and New Years it’s 75%, but you get the point.

I could be wrong, but I think a lot of people would fare pretty well with this A- approach. I think a lot of people go for that 110% with their diet and workouts, but then burn out on it. It goes a little something like this:

January: Time to get ripped! 6 days of working out, never missing a workout. Score: 100/100, A.
February: I’m not quite ripped yet. Hmmm… Maybe I’ll work out a little more – twice a day on some days. Score: 110/100, A+.
March: Why don’t I look like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson (or Scarlett Johansson) yet??? This sucks! And things are getting busy with work, kids, home, etc. Working out when I feel like it: Score: 60/100, D.
April: Crap. I think gained some weight back. Better hit it hard again. Score: 90/100, A-.
2nd half of April: I don’t have time to work out 5 or 6 days per week right now – A.K.A too busy to work out at all. Score: 0/100, F.
May: Spotty workouts. Score 6/10, D.
June through December: More sporadic workouts for an average score of 40/100, F.

Score for the year: F

I followed a routine like that from about age 24 to 29. But now, here is how I work out over the course of a year:

January: Everyone else is working out hard, so I’ll join in too. Work out 6 days per week. Score: 100/100, A.
February: As much as I like a 6-day schedule, I’m going down a little. Work out 5 days per week. Score: 95/100, A.
March: Have a bunch of things going on. Work out 3 days per week on average with some active rest activities in between – helping with kids’ sports, etc. Score: 80/100.
April: Back to the 4 or 5 day per week plan. Score: 90/100, A-.
May: I’m just not feeling it. Maintaining with 3 days per week. Score: 80/100, B-.
So far, a 89% grade. Not bad.
June through December: 100, 100, 80, 90, 90, 85, 90.
Score for the year: 90%, A-

I know some people teach differently. It needs to be all-in, all-the-time. It’s probably more of a personality thing. There is certainly nothing wrong in my eyes with getting ripped for a bodybuilding physique challenge/competition. Some of my friends are triathletes, and I think there is something to be said for challenging the body in that way – if that’s your thing. All of these things bring forth a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment, which is great.

Right now though, for me, this 90% grade seems to work. It keeps me in good shape, and now that I have come to terms that I might not get to Mount Ripped-more, I can focus a little more clearly on other things in life – this blog being one of them.

A- in other areas of life

This A- thing – never allowing to get below 80% – got me thinking… this does not only apply to diet and fitness. Recently I’ve had to ask myself, “Where am I at with the following things in life?”

Fitness
Diet
Showing appreciation toward my wife
Spending time with my kids
Career
Spiritual life
Personal development
Missional contribution

Am I operating at less than a “B” grade with any of these?

What if my whole life ran at this A-, or at least a B+ average in all of these areas. How balanced and happy would I be?

What did you think of this article? Let me know in the comments! And if you got something valuable out of this, feel free to share!

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Food Prep Day: Preparing to eat healthy for (most of) the week

Published on August 30, 2014 by in Healthy Eating

Alright, I’ve been getting a lot of questions about nutrition lately and the importance of nutrition in weight loss. How do I eat eat healthy on a budget? How do I eat healthy when my spouse is not on board? How can I stay consistent with my diet? I plan on addressing these and other questions in an upcoming video series, but for now I want to give you a glimpse into one healthy habit I have adopted, and that is preparing food ahead of time to make eating healthy a little easier throughout the week.

Typically, when I am really dialing in my diet, I like to prepare most of my meals for the week on Sunday. They might not all be fully prepared, but I get things set up for meals and snacks for the whole family. It takes an investment of a couple hours, 1 day per week. Believe me, it makes all the difference in the world to help me stay on track.

Last Sunday I snapped a few pictures while I was doing my food prep. Again, this is a snippet of what I have planned for my upcoming video series, but hopefully you can walk away with some good ideas from this blog.

First, here’s a look at what my counter looks like when I’m about to start prepping. It is important to have several of this items on hand in order to be set up for success when preparing food.

S4 Download 992

Here’s a checklist, which I think every kitchen should have: Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

News from Summit and New Promotions

Published on June 24, 2014 by in Uncategorized

I thought about sending out a giant, jam-packed email with all of the new information I got from this last week’s Beachbody Summit in Las Vegas. Instead I made a short video.

The video has some new product announcements and some limited time offers, so be sure to check them out.


To take advantage of any of the information in this video, just go CLICK HERE to sign up for free and browse all of the current promotions.

Or you can click Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

How to Eliminate Man Boobs

It’s not something every guy is comfortable asking, but from time to time I get asked, “How do I get rid of my man boobs.” It’s a valid question, and something a lot of guys are self conscious about, so let’s figure this out.

 

My first piece of advice is to get a bra, or a “bro”. Nothing fancy, just something to hold the puppies in place. I’m kidding.

 

First let’s look at the fact if you technically have “boobs.” Most men do not. If you have done steroids in the past or have some sort of hormonal imbalance from a medical condition, then you may have a varying case of gynecomastia, which is the technical name for man boobs. There are various hormonal conditions that can cause this in grown men. It can also occur in infants and boys going through puberty, but will usually subside over a brief period of time in these cases. Older men may also develop some form of gynecomastia as they age and testosterone levels drop.

 

Most men with the appearance of man boobs actually have Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Is the Beachbody Coaching Thing a Scam?

Published on June 17, 2014 by in Earn Money

Well, I guess the question of the Beachbody coaching opportunity being a scam is mostly coming from people skeptical of network marketing and MLM’s. And yes, Team Beachbody is a network marketing vessel of Beachbody, the creator of P90X, Insanity, and other tops selling fitness programs.

There will always be skeptics. But let me do my best to give you the REALITY of the Beachbody Coaching opportunity.

 

Let’s first look at why people sign up to be a coach. In my four years as a coach, I have seen that people sign up to be a coach for several different reasons:

 

1. To get a discount on products – if you are getting Shakeology, why not get it at 25% off?

2. To make some extra money - if you are already telling your friends about the great results you got with your workouts and Shakeology, why not get paid a little for the recommendation?

3. To build a business and Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

The Pull Up Progression

Published on April 11, 2014 by in Fitness

“The Pull Up Progression”

 

One of the questions I often get asked is how to do/modify/accomplish the pull up exercise. When I first started P90X several years ago, pull ups were a struggle for me. I couldn’t do one, well, maybe one really ugly one if I flailed my body around doing a fish-out-of-water dance to get my chin over the bar. Fast-forward to today and my recent best is 22 standard grip pull ups. Below I’ll offer some tips on how to go from “I can’t do pull ups” to doing several reps.

 

First, let’s look at the ways to modify pull ups in order of difficulty (easiest first) Read more…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
© Glen Gosch Fitness | Fitness at A-